Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Universal Design for Learning Principle III (Multiple Means of Engagement) Guideline 7 (Recruiting Interest)

About this UDL Series of Posts: I am looking to explore, connect to potential universal practice and individualized assistive technology practice (for the population of students that I work with) each of the guidelines as a summer blogging project.  This is my personal exploration of the "big picture" of how assistive technology for students with complex needs connects to a universally designed inclusive classroom.

Links to posts in this series follow:

Universal Design for Learning Principle I (Multiple Means of Representation) Overview
  • Universal Design for Learning Principle I (Multiple Means of Representation) Guideline 1 (Perception)
  • Universal Design for Learning Principal I (Multiple Means of Representation) Guideline 2 (Language, Expression and Symbols)
  • Universal Design for Learning Principle I (Multiple Means of Representation) Guideline 3 (Comprehension)
Universal Design for Learning Principle II (Multiple Means of Action and Expression) Overview
  • Universal Design for Learning Principle II (Multiple Means of Action and Expression) Guideline 4 (Physical Action)
  • Universal Design for Learning Principle II (Multiple Means of Action and Expression) Guideline 5 (Expression and Communication)
  • Universal Design for Learning Principle III (Multiple Means of Action and Expression) Guideline 6 (Executive Function)
Universal Design for Learning Principle III (Multiple Means of Engagement) Overview
Below is the second of a 12 post series.  As I finish each post, links will be added to the outline above.

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Universal Design for Learning Principle III
Multiple Means of Engagement
Guideline 7: Recruiting Interest
In his book, Kaufman starts the chapter on passion by exploring intrinsic motivation. He examines Edward Deci and Richard Ryan's self-determination theory that speaks to our basic human needs of competence, autonomy and relatedness.
According to Edward Deci and Richard Ryan's self-determination theory (SDT), tasks that are intrinsically motivating satisfy the basic human psychological needs of competence (the desire to feel capable of mastery and accomplishment), autonomy (the desire to feel in control of one's decisions), and relatedness (a desire to feel a sense of connection with peers). A number of studies show that tasks that satisfy all three of these basic strivings lead to the highest levels of intrinsic motivation.
What does this equate to in practice for both students with and without "disabilities"?  How do we, as educators, create the conditions for learning that will facilitate intrinsic motivation in students?  Kaufman builds a case, through evaluating results of several experiments and theories in motivation, that the enhancement of contextualization, personalization and choice affect intrinsic motivation and this, in turn, affects mastery of concepts.

The UDL Checkpoints for Guideline 7 include:
These checkpoints have clear connections to the concepts of competence, autonomy, relatedness, contextualization, personalization and choice that Kaufmann writes about in his chapter on "passions" and give some insight in to the "how" of addressing this guideline. 

My intention had been to put information about each of the checkpoints in this same post but as I got writing, I realized the potential of that creating a very long and overwhelming post.  Instead, I have created a separate page for each of the checkpoints and linked them in the bulleted list above.  Following those links will bring you to a discussion about the checkpoint as well as universal and specialized practical applications of each checkpoint. 

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Technology to Support Guideline 7
Options for Recruiting Interest

The following video is one of a series that outlines iPad apps that can be used for each of the Guidelines.  This particular video outlines how to use Symbaloo to support options for recruiting interest. 

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