Exploring and reflecting on meaningful pathways to inclusive and personalized learning and living for students with complex developmental needs because education should prepare all students for a lifetime of inclusion, connection, growth and learning.

Sunday, May 27, 2012

Change... Again...

The days where all of my students and the learning assistants that work with them are under the same roof are now numbered.  Things are beginning to wind down for the year and we are in full swing in regards to thinking about and planning for next year.  The k-12 students that have served within the walls of the elementary school that our program is housed in will be going to age-appropriate schools this fall.  That means my eight students will be in three different schools come September.  Three of them will remain where they are, two will go to Junior High school and the remaining three are off to High School.  I will continue to coordinate the programs in a bit different capacity then what I have been doing - although it will not be that much of a change as my job has been changing a lot during this school year already.

The elementary students under my umbrella joined elementary classrooms either last year or this and I know provide mostly indirect services to them.  These students will either remain in general education classroom at the school they are at or move to Junior High and continue in the general education classroom there.  I will continue to oversee and support them in the same way that I have this year.  My high school students are a bit different.  They will go to the High School and their programs will consist of a combination of being included in option style classes and having some of their program delivered in a more self-contained setting. 

It will be a challenge to coordinate things at three different locations but I am excited for the opportunities that it will open up for my students.
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Saturday, May 26, 2012

Literacy for All Pilot Project Update

Way back at the beginning of the year, I posted about the "Literacy for All" pilot project that our school was going to a part of for the 2011-12 school year.  The project involved bringing educators from across the province of Alberta together to examine literacy learning for students with significant disabilities. In this past year we have met face to face, met online, participated in a online community, and used and examined the resources "MeVille to WeVille" and "Children with Disabilities: Reading and Writing the Four Blocks Way".  The project was built upon the premise that ALL students can learn literacy.  Being part of this project has given me the opportunity to further explore what it means when we say that we are going to teach literacy skills to students with significant disabilities and ultimately culminated in a desire to learn more.  It is evident that there is much that we can do by way of teaching literacy to students in this population and I'm excited to take what I've learned this year and continue to expand on it in years to come.

As the project wraps up, a wiki has been created to share information about literacy learning for students with significant disabilities.  My understanding is that the wiki will continue to be updated.  Check it out at http://abliteracyforall.wikispaces.com/.


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Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Today's Quote...

"Teaching is, at its core, a moral profession.  Helping students become connected, passion-driven learners is a moral issue.  Most of us went into education to change the world, to help kids, to make a difference, and somewhere along the way, many of us lost sight of that moral purpose.  

We all have a choice: A choice to be powerful or pitiful. A choice to allow ourselves to become victims or activists. A choice to take a stand on behalf of the children we serve.  

The world is at your fingertips. Figure out your personal vision for change in your school or classroom. Learn how to leverage the wisdom of the crowd. Build alliance. Find your tribe, your community.  Then do something powerful to promote change.  Sit down with other educators and share what you learn.  Be a transparent learner. Be an example you want your students to become.  Show them what a learner does to make the world a better place.

Choose to be powerful." 

Source: "The Connected Educator: Learning and Leading in the Digital Age"
by Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach and Lani Ritter Hall
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Tuesday, May 22, 2012

I've Been Tagged

Nicole over at the blog "The Autism Teacher" tagged me in a post.  I'm honored.  So I will continue the chain...

  • Tell 7 things about myself
  • Tag 7 blogs I love and 
  • Hope those bloggers continue passing on the "cyber-accolades" 
Seven Things About Myself
  • I have a 13 year old son named Mikey - whom also happens to be on my caseload at work :).
  • I was lifeguard through highschool and university.  It was a great summer job.
  • I have never traveled anywhere outside of Canada and the US.
  • I am the second of 4 children in my family and the only girl in the bunch.
  • I currently live only a half hour from the town that I grew up in.
  • I think I have the best job in the whole world.
  • I should be asleep as I'm going to be tired at work tomorrow.
Seven Blogs I Love
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Monday, May 21, 2012

Literacy in Augmentative and Alternative Communication



This past week I traveled to Toronto for a "Literacy in AAC" course that was delivered by Karen Erikson and David Koppenhaver (the authors of the book "Children with Disabilities: Reading and Writing the Four-Blocks Way").  The focus of the course was on developing literacy skills in students who have complex communication needs. 

I do believe in literacy learning for all students but this course challenged me to further redefine what "literacy learning" is for the students that I teach.  I have been moving towards an understanding of generative reading and writing over the past couple of years but coming to understand that and actually having a plan of action around how to make that happen are two different things.  I came out of this course feeling like there is now an action plan and that plan is rooted in ensuring that the students that I am responsible for have a comprehensive literacy program that includes interactions related to each of the four blocks of literacy during the course of their days.  For the elementary and junior high students that I have this will mean using curriculum overlapping as they will be in inclusive settings for a large portion of their day.  For the elements that are more important to do directly, we will do a pull out intervention time to work on this.  For the high school students that I have I am looking at creating a literacy class that is equivalent in time to a five-credit course as well as finding another time in the day for students to do self-selected reading.

With some of my students we will be starting at the beginning and for others we will be building on the emergent skills that they already have.  Being part of the Alberta Education "Literacy for All" Pilot project this year has put us in a situation where we have built some of the foundation that we can build on with this new information.  

I would have a hard time summarizing all that I have learned so am hoping to do it over time in reference to what we learn as we implement different aspects.  Where we start is to rethink the need for exploration and interaction without limits related to reading and writing for all of the students that I teach.  So that means using alternate pencils to "write" in the same way that preschool students "write" (i.e. scribble a bunch of letter like figures) without correcting or trying to direct - but rather just naming letters and exposing the student to purposes for writing.  A couple neat suggestions around finding purposes for writing included using remnant books (which I have tried using in the past to create opportunities for communication) where everyone in the students life adds pictures and items to the book related to some thing that happened in their life.  Whomever adds the picture and item also adds a sticky note with a brief description of what it is about.  Then when it is time to write, the student picks which item in his/her writing book that he/she wants to write about and then he/she writes using an alternate pencil.  Here is where what we would have traditionally done needs to be rethought.  Instead of showing the student how to use the alternate pencil to write the words that you want to write about the the thing that he/she has picked to write about, you allow the student to just write - put down whatever letters he or she says he/she wants to put down when writing and you talk to them about their writing - in the same way that you would look at your toddlers picture with scribbles under it and know that is his/her writing at that time.  They did say that it is okay to to pull out one letter and write a word related to the topic but to not do it in a way that corrects and to not take away or direct their writing at this point.  As students are exposed to a comprehensive literacy program, their writing evolves as a result of the interaction of the components of the program.  A second idea was to put "captions" on pictures - again not correcting or directing but allowing for exploration and interaction.  It is a bit of a shift.  I'm excited to get started.  

This is obviously only a small piece.  As I start to figure out how to take all of this stuff that is spinning around in my head and put it in to action I am sure I will be writing more.  

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Sunday, May 20, 2012

COACH3: Choosing Outcomes & Accommodations for Children: A Guide to Educatoinal Planning for Students with Disabilities


Planning for the 2012-13 school year is in full swing as we are looking to move all of the students that I have on my caseload to their age appropriate schools this fall.  I will continue to oversee their programs at each of the three schools.  There is still a lot in the air around what things will look like exactly (we have ideas but because they are new we will need to be flexible and responsive to situations and students).

One of the shifts we are trying to make is for the starting point to be what the individualized goals are for these students and then to build their individual programs, including where each aspect of those programs will be delivered, based on that.  This is really the way it should be done but somehow we have gotten caught up in putting them in to a program based on a diagnosis or perception and then building a program that ensures they fit in to the program as it exists.  It was never intentional. I think we just sometimes get stuck in things because they seem to be more efficient.  But really we should be looking for efficient and effective and sometimes that means sacrificing a little bit of the efficient.

Here is where the COACH3 model comes in.  Where are starting with planning individual programs for next year is to work through the COACH3 (Giangreco, Coloninger & Iverson) with parents so that we can discover what the learning priorities they have for their children are. It will be interesting to know if they match with what I think they are.  It will also be helpful as we continue to plan for what their programs will look like next year in their new settings. 

The family interview and figuring out what the priority learning outcomes in that meeting is just the first part of the process.  The next thing we do is look at supplemental outcomes based on what other team members feel is important and then look at the general supports that will be in place.  This information is then used to create annual goals, short term objectives and a program-at-a-glance.  Ultimately all of this is used to create the student's IEP.

I'm excited to try the model as I looked long and hard at both this one and "The Beyond Access Model".  In the end I decided on this because it is a little bit more laid out and right now we kind of need that.  As we continue to move forward we will continue to evaluate what the best tool to plan for programming for these students is.
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